Podcast

Briefly 3.3 – Genealogy Databases and the Fourth Amendment

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we're discussing law enforcement's use of genealogy databases to solve cold cases and related Fourth Amendment implications. We spoke to Natalie Ram, Assistant Professor at the University of Baltimore Law School, and Jason Kreag, Associate Professor at the University of Arizona James… Continue reading Briefly 3.3 – Genealogy Databases and the Fourth Amendment

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Taking Rulemaking Procedures Seriously in Bending the Rules by Rachel Augustine Potter

Notice-and-comment rulemaking is often thought of as a fixed process: if agency X follows the process then it creates binding regulation Y. Yet, there is considerable variation in how the notice-and-comment rulemaking process actually proceeds. For instance, Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency allotted only 15 days for public comment on a recently proposed rule. This amount… Continue reading Taking Rulemaking Procedures Seriously in Bending the Rules by Rachel Augustine Potter

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Unequal State Sovereignty: Considering the Equal State Sovereignty Principle Through Nineteenth-Century Election Laws by Zachary Newkirk

Introduction The equal state sovereignty principle may be “our historic tradition,” but it is an ill-defined, unexplored, and ambiguous one. In Shelby County v. Holder, the Supreme Court invalidated Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act (“VRA”) as a violation of the “fundamental principle of equal sovereignty.” Section 4(b) contained a formula that required some… Continue reading Unequal State Sovereignty: Considering the Equal State Sovereignty Principle Through Nineteenth-Century Election Laws by Zachary Newkirk

Podcast

Briefly 3.2 – How to Save a Constitutional Democracy

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we're discussing the global trend of democratic backsliding with Professor Aziz Huq and Professor Tom Ginsburg of the University of Chicago Law School. Professors Ginsburg and Huq have recently written the book, "How to Save a Constitutional Democracy," on that subject. Music… Continue reading Briefly 3.2 – How to Save a Constitutional Democracy

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The Origins of War Manifestos by Oona A. Hathaway, William S. Holste, Scott J. Shapiro, Jacqueline Van De Velde, and Lisa Wang Lachowicz

Our recent article, War Manifestos, was the first work of legal scholarship to examine the documents that set out the legal reasons sovereigns provided for going to war from the late fifteenth century until the mid-twentieth century. The article described these “war manifestos” and explored their history and evolution over the course of five centuries.… Continue reading The Origins of War Manifestos by Oona A. Hathaway, William S. Holste, Scott J. Shapiro, Jacqueline Van De Velde, and Lisa Wang Lachowicz

Podcast

Briefly 2.8 – Solving the Privacy Paradox

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing some legal concerns related to the collection and use, or misuse, of personal data. Today’s podcast features interviews with Professor Lior Strahilevitz and Professor Omri Ben-Shahar, from the University of Chicago Law School. This episode was produced by Yosef Schaffel.… Continue reading Briefly 2.8 – Solving the Privacy Paradox