Briefly 4.4 – Of Consent and Butt-Dials

Do you enjoy a reasonable expectation of privacy for pocket dials? The answer might surprise you. Host Deb Malamud chats with several privacy law experts to explore this complex legal question and its implications for how we interact in a tech-centered world. Guests: Lior Strahilevitz (U. Chicago), Margaret Hu (Penn State), and Julian Sanchez (The Cato Institute).

Briefly 3.13 – Interpreting the Law through Corpus Linguistics

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing Corpus Linguistics, which is a sub-field of linguistics that employs database searches to study language usage. Through this linguistic method, jurists, lawyers, and legal academics can add empirical rigor to textualist assumptions regarding the legal meaning of words, based on … Continue reading Briefly 3.13 – Interpreting the Law through Corpus Linguistics

Briefly 3.12 – Experimental Jurisprudence

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing Experimental Jurisprudence, which is an emerging field that uses empirical methods, particularly from the cognitive sciences, to clarify important concepts in the law. For example, scholars in this field conduct experiments to understand what ordinary people make of legal concepts, … Continue reading Briefly 3.12 – Experimental Jurisprudence

Briefly 3.11 – Social Media and Market Manipulation

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we are discussing social media influencers and their ability to manipulate markets. We also discuss the legal regime that governs influencers and the agencies, namely the SEC and FTC, that regulate them. We're joined by Anna Pinedo, a partner in Mayer Brown's … Continue reading Briefly 3.11 – Social Media and Market Manipulation