Briefly 3.13 – Interpreting the Law through Corpus Linguistics

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing Corpus Linguistics, which is a sub-field of linguistics that employs database searches to study language usage. Through this linguistic method, jurists, lawyers, and legal academics can add empirical rigor to textualist assumptions regarding the legal meaning of words, based on … Continue reading Briefly 3.13 – Interpreting the Law through Corpus Linguistics

Briefly 3.12 – Experimental Jurisprudence

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing Experimental Jurisprudence, which is an emerging field that uses empirical methods, particularly from the cognitive sciences, to clarify important concepts in the law. For example, scholars in this field conduct experiments to understand what ordinary people make of legal concepts, … Continue reading Briefly 3.12 – Experimental Jurisprudence

Briefly 3.11 – Social Media and Market Manipulation

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we are discussing social media influencers and their ability to manipulate markets. We also discuss the legal regime that governs influencers and the agencies, namely the SEC and FTC, that regulate them. We're joined by Anna Pinedo, a partner in Mayer Brown's … Continue reading Briefly 3.11 – Social Media and Market Manipulation

Briefly 3.9 – Universal Basic Income

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing the Universal Basic Income, which is a wealth transfer policy endorsed by many politicians and academics. We're joined by Professors Daniel Hemel and Todd Henderson of the University of Chicago Law School, who help us analyze the legal, economic, and … Continue reading Briefly 3.9 – Universal Basic Income

Briefly 3.8 – When Should Courts Overturn Precedent?

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing when courts should overturn precedent. We're joined by two legal scholars who have studied this question: Professor William Baude of the University of Chicago Law School and Professor Richard Re of UCLA School of Law. We discuss the value of … Continue reading Briefly 3.8 – When Should Courts Overturn Precedent?