Is Business and Human Rights Suitable for the Compliance Function? by Michael K. Addo

Introduction The links between business, human rights, and compliance are often nonobvious. Firstly, these are disciplines and discourses that have evolved separately. Secondly, in the few incidental contexts where human rights and compliance have been mentioned together, it has often been in the context of voluntary initiatives that fall at the less compelling end of … Continue reading Is Business and Human Rights Suitable for the Compliance Function? by Michael K. Addo

More Meaningful Ethics by Veronica Root Martinez

Introduction Creating systems to create, promote, and encourage ethical behavior within firms is a maddeningly difficult endeavor. Whether one focuses on the purposeful decision to attempt to cheat emissions standards by Volkswagen, the failure of attorneys to alert upper management regarding potential problems with an ignition switch at General Motors, the creation of standards that … Continue reading More Meaningful Ethics by Veronica Root Martinez

Investigating Intersections of Corporate Governance & Compliance by Veronica Root Martinez

Symposium Introduction In April 2019, Notre Dame Law in London hosted a conference entitled “Investigating Intersections of Corporate Governance & Compliance” with scholars from the United States and United Kingdom participating.  The goal of the conference was to facilitate dialogue within and amongst legal scholarly disciplines regarding the ways in which governance and compliance intersect.  … Continue reading Investigating Intersections of Corporate Governance & Compliance by Veronica Root Martinez

Originalist Fiction as Constitutional Faith by Eric J. Segall

Professor Christopher Green’s respectful review of my book “Originalism as Faith” argues that my project “has one big virtue” but several “flaws.” He says that the book “properly points out elements of hypocrisy from originalists on the Court but draws the wrong lesson from that hypocrisy” because it “muddies” the “crucial distinctions . . . between Court … Continue reading Originalist Fiction as Constitutional Faith by Eric J. Segall

Briefly 3.9 – Universal Basic Income

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing the Universal Basic Income, which is a wealth transfer policy endorsed by many politicians and academics. We're joined by Professors Daniel Hemel and Todd Henderson of the University of Chicago Law School, who help us analyze the legal, economic, and … Continue reading Briefly 3.9 – Universal Basic Income

The Political Economy of Judicial Federalism by Michael E. Solimine

Professor Diego Zambrano’s recent article in the University of Chicago Law Review, Federal Expansion and the Decay of State Courts, is an institutional and comparative examination of federal and state courts as it pertains to judicial federalism. While judicial federalism has a long and complicated history, by most accounts, in the past several decades, both … Continue reading The Political Economy of Judicial Federalism by Michael E. Solimine

Fifth Circuit Will Reconsider Constitutionality of ICWA’s Race-Based Burdens by Timothy Sandefur

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals announced on November 7 that it will rehear a case called Brackeen v. Bernhardt that weighs the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). Adopted in 1978, ICWA was written in response to concerns that Native American children were being unjustly taken from their parents by social workers … Continue reading Fifth Circuit Will Reconsider Constitutionality of ICWA’s Race-Based Burdens by Timothy Sandefur