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The Admissibility of Forensic Reports in the Post–Justice Scalia Supreme Court by Laird Kirkpatrick

Forensic reports linking a defendant to a crime—such as drug tests, blood analysis, DNA profiles, and much more—often constitute the most powerful and persuasive evidence that can be offered at a criminal trial. Yet the Supreme Court is sharply divided about the constitutionally required foundation for the admission of such reports. Its opinions on the… Continue reading The Admissibility of Forensic Reports in the Post–Justice Scalia Supreme Court by Laird Kirkpatrick

Podcast

Briefly 3.4 – The Chicago School of Antitrust and the Digital Economy

This is Briefly, a production of the University of Chicago Law Review. Today we’re discussing the Chicago School of Antitrust and whether it should be reassessed in the modern, digital economy. We spoke to Timothy Muris, Professor at the Antonin Scalia Law School and former Chairman of the FTC, Jonathan Nuechterlein, partner at Sidley Austin… Continue reading Briefly 3.4 – The Chicago School of Antitrust and the Digital Economy

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Why the NCAA’s No-Transfer Rule Is No Good by Michael A. Carrier & Marc Edelman

Earlier this year, after suffering from depression, University of Michigan football lineman James Hudson applied to transfer to the University of Cincinnati. Hudson aimed to start anew at Cincinnati, immediately joining the school’s football team. But unfortunately, Hudson’s hopes were dashed. The NCAA’s “year-in-residence” rule requires Division I college athletes to sit out a year… Continue reading Why the NCAA’s No-Transfer Rule Is No Good by Michael A. Carrier & Marc Edelman